Dementia Care Site Map
Power of Attorney explained

Office of the Public Advocate - offers a range of information:

 

Click here for program designed by Office of Public Advocate to provide information about what a power of Attorney is, the different types and responsibilities and how to choose a suitable person, based on things that are important to you. 

 

Many people have a Will to let people know their wishes after they die but what if you were faced with an accident or illness and were unable to make decisions for yourself?

 

Have you given people the right legal authority to make decisions for you? As with a Will, you can make legal documents that allow decisions to be made that take into account your wishes.

 

The difference is that these documents allow you to control who will make financial, medical and/or lifestyle decisions while you are still alive.

 

You can choose a person to act on your behalf to make these decisions. You can make:

 

  • a general power of attorney by appointing someone to make financial or legal decisions for you, usually for a specific period of time, such as when you are away on holidays
  • an enduring power of attorney (financial) by appointing someone to make financial and legal decisions on your behalf, such as signing a legal document, selling property or doing your banking, if you are unable to make these decisions some time in the future
  • an enduring power of attorney (medical treatment) by appointing someone to make medical decisions on your behalf, such as agreeing to or refusing surgery, if you are unable to make these decisions some time in the future
  • an enduring power of guardianship by appointing someone to make day-to-day lifestyle decisions on your behalf, such as where you live and health care issues, if you are unable to make these decisions some time in the future.

 

An attorney can be anyone you trust to make decisions on your behalf, like a family member or friend.